Philosophy and Critical Thinking Resources for the Secondary Classroom
Philosophy and Critical Thinking Resources for the Secondary Classroom
PUBLISHED: Tuesday, October 29, 2019 by Andilynn Feddeler

Students are naturally curious about the world around them, and are constantly questioning philosophical issues surrounding friendship, knowledge, reality, and more. Open your students’ minds to the wonders of philosophy and inspire animated discussions of questions that concern kids—and all of us—with these innovative, interactive books.

  • Philosophy for Kids: 40 Fun Questions That Help You Wonder About Everything! offers young people the opportunity to become acquainted with the wonders of philosophy. Packed with exciting activities arranged around the topics of values, knowledge, reality, and critical thinking, this book can be used individually or by the whole class. 

  • Philosophy for Teens: Questioning Life's Big Ideas examines some of life’s biggest topics, such as lying, cheating, love, beauty, the role of government, hate, prejudice, and more. Each chapter includes discussion questions, thought experiments, exercises and activities, and community action steps to help students make reasoned, informed decisions about some of life’s greatest debates.

  • The Examined Life: Advanced Philosophy for Kids offers ways teachers can help students grapple with age-old questions about the nature of friendship (Aristotle), time (Augustine), knowledge (Plato), existence of God (Aquinas), perception (Berkeley), freedom and society (Rousseau), and many more.

  • More Philosophy for Teens: Examining Reality and Knowledge tackles some of life’s toughest questions, including identity, God, the universe, freedom, and the meaning of life. Both sides of the debates are covered on every issue, with information from some of the world’s most noted philosophers included in a conversational style that teenagers will love. 

  • Socratic Methods in the Classroom: Encouraging Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Through Dialogue explains how teachers may use questioning, reasoning, and dialogue to encourage critical thinking, problem solving, and independent learning in the secondary classroom. Students will learn to reason judiciously, gain an understanding of important issues, and develop the necessary skills to discuss these issues in their communities.