Authors: Janice I Robbins, Ph.D., Carol L. Tieso, Ph.D.
Product Code: 2597
ISBN: 978-1-61821-259-7
Pages: 156
Availability: In stock.


Engaging With History in the Classroom: The Civil Rights Movement is the fourth in a series of middle-grade U.S. history units that focus on what it means to be an American citizen, living in a democracy that expects as much from its citizens as it provides to them. In every lesson, students are asked to step into the world of the Civil Rights movement, to hear about and to see what was happening, to read the words of real people, and to imagine their hopes, dreams, and feelings. Students also learn to question the accounts left behind and to recognize different perspectives on events that marked significant changes in the legal definitions of civil rights. Resources for teachers include a running script that's useful as a model for guiding conceptualization as well as extensive teacher notes with practical suggestions for personalizing activities.

Grades 6–8

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by Lisa Cassidy
on 7/2/2015
from Kailua, Hawaii
Engaging With History in the Classroom; The Civil Rights Movement
“A Think Outside the Box” resource.  As a sixth grade teacher I value Engaging with History in the Classroom Civil Rights Movement Edition.  The lesson plan format is easy to follow and will truly engage students.  My school district follows the CCSS which challenge students and teachers to a higher level of thinking, reading, writing. The Civil Rights Movement Edition meets these requirements.  The “hooks” engage the students, primary resources offer different perspectives that students are not exposed to many textbooks, and the “SOAR” section helps students reflect and teachers assess. In addition, offering a variety of perspectives along with critical thought questions helps students form their own perspectives and opinions on the Civil Rights Movement. 
Engaging with History in the Classroom is also a tool for differentiating instruction by offering  extension lesson suggestions that allow students to dig deeper into the Civil Rights Movement.  As a teacher I would highly recommend this engaging resource. Looking forward to exploring other units offered in Engaging with History In the Classroom series.
by Patricia Walsh
on 3/19/2015
from Williamsburg, VA
Engaging With History in the Classroom: The Civil Rights Movement
One need only peruse the Table of Contents to get a sense of the pivotal questions posed that guide each of the 12 Lessons within this unit of study. These inquiries help lead students to an understanding of The Civil Rights Movement and the overall concept of being "change makers." E.g. How Did Individuals and Groups Build Momentum for Change?, Can Children Be Change Agents For Equal Rights?, Who Works For Social Justice?

Resources abound in the unit and contain both primary and secondary sources, readings and documents as well as on-line sites that provide the student(s)
the opportunity for independent and/or group investigations.  

The authors have provided educators with a powerful vehicle, especially for this age group,to learn and appreciate what constitutes a Movement, what part The Civil Rights Movement played and continues to play in our history and how students might incorporate the idea of Social Justice and Change into their lives both now and in the future.
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Reviews

Review: Gifted Child Today - December 17, 2015
Primary sources and authentic artifacts enhance history lessons and help to create inviting learning environments for students while developing in-depth conceptual knowledge. Janice I. Robbins and Carol L. Tieso present a series of four books that entice middle school students to explore . . . The books are replete with lessons, handouts, and thorough instructions for teachers to build knowledge and perspective in their classroom while following history curriculum standards.
 
Review by: Jody Passanisi, Shara Peters, MiddleWeb - April 5, 2015
. . . For a new teacher without any curriculum options at his or her disposal, this is an incredibly rich resource. For a teacher with an existing curriculum, it is useful as well--one in which the teacher can “choose their own adventure,” picking from some well-thought-out course material, deciding what offerings best supplement their current content in the classroom and what suits their teaching style and objectives . . . . Overall, this is an extremely worthwhile tool for United States History teachers to have on the actual or virtual bookshelf. The four-book series can be used by any teacher, regardless of where they are in their career, to enhance their curriculum.
 

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